My Top 20 Films of 2016

It’s time for my top films of 2016, and this year it wasn’t all about the superhero blockbusters for a change (except for one of them!). From Japanese anime that isn’t from Studio Ghibli to a Japanese anime that was announced to be Studio Ghibli’s last, to Disney and more Disney and even a Disney classic adaptation, 2016 was definitely an accomplished year for animation. And let’s not forget about those incredible book adaptations, which make up nearly half of my top 20. It certainly was an impressive year!

This year I’ve watched 563 films (42 released this year, and 247 for the first time). That’s 47 films on average per month, and 11 on average per week.

My most watched directors are Steven Spielberg, Alfred Hitchcock, and Tony Scott, and my most watched actor is Owen Wilson.

Click here for a constantly updated list of my favourite films of the year.

And here it is, my Top 20 Films of 2016:

20. The Neon Demon

Review to come.

19. Zootopia

Review to come.

18. The Jungle Book

It’s not often that a remake – let alone a CGI-heavy remake – of many of our favourite childhood films is successful, but The Jungle Book has certainly surpassed all of our expectations on that front. With equal measures of action and comedy, Favreau directs this already enjoyable story with real style.

Read my full review here.

17. Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them

Review to come.

16. The Girl On The Train

The Girl on the Train is the kind of film that I know I would have absolutely loved if I had not read the book beforehand but, being such a fan of the source material, there were too many niggling differences that prevented me from doing so. Based on one of my favourite books this year, The Girl on the Train is a brilliant and mysterious thriller, led by three powerful and relatable women who take you on an intense journey, switching from the past and present, to reveal the ongoings of a murder investigation and, ultimately, how their lives all interlink.

Read my full review here.

15. 10 Cloverfield Lane

10 Cloverfield Lane does what every psychological thriller should do: it keeps you on the edge of your seat. It’s very rare that a film can make you feel so uncomfortable and claustrophobic, but that’s why this film is such an intense watch. Faced with the gut-wrenching decision to either go outside and possibly face an alien invasion, or to stay inside with a creepy John Goodman, who may or may not be a genuinely kind-hearted odd-ball, we face Michelle’s dilemma with her. Personally, I don’t think I could have spent another minute with Goodman, and will forever be terrified of the man we once knew as Fred Flintstone.

Read my full review here.

14. Moana

Review to come.

13. I, Daniel Blake

Review to come.

12. Creed

Review to come.

11. Nocturnal Animals

Review to come.

10. When Marnie Was There

Review to come.

9. Your Name.

Review to come.

8. The Revenant

Since the release of the first trailer, I have been eager to see this film because of the strikingly beautiful visuals that have stood out from the very beginning. Even from these mere few minutes of footage, it was obvious that The Revenant was going to be something special. With cinematography by Emmanuel Lubezki, as well, who has won the Academy Award for the past two years with the films Birdman and Gravity, hopes were high that The Revenant wasn’t going to ruin his streak of success.

Read my full review here.

7. Deadpool

It’s not often that a superhero is foul-mouthed, crude, gore-loving, and sadistic – although it is occasional that they are gruesomely disfigured, egotistic, and mentally unstable – but 2016 is the year of the anti-hero, and the “Merc with a Mouth” just became one of our favourite superheroes of them all.

Read my full review here.

6. Spotlight

Review to come.

5. Room

With the novel told from the perspective of five-year-old Jack, Room is told with the same narrative style as the film unfolds from Jack’s point of view. Jack knows nothing but the 11×11 square room that he has grown up in, as the story focuses on his struggle to come to terms with the thought of even a single blade of grass existing outside of the walls he is imprisoned in.

Read my full review here.

4. The Danish Girl

From the director of The King’s Speech (2010) and Les Misérables (2012), yet again alongside cinematographer Danny Cohen (with this being their fifth collaboration), The Danish Girl is a beautiful piece of filmmaking that tells a powerful and incredibly unique story. Hooper and Cohen are the perfect filmmaking duo. Hooper’s work is always beautiful to watch, and The Danish Girl is no different. The cinematography is as well captured as one of Lili and Gerda’s paintings in the film, with the stunning backdrop of Copenhagen’s harbour further complimenting their style perfectly.

Read my full review here.

3. Arrival

Review to come.

2. The Light Between The Oceans

Review to come.

1. The Hateful Eight

Review to come.

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