Day 12: Copenhagen

Having arrived in Denmark yesterday, we spent our first day in the capital, Copenhagen. After having a quick drink in the city last night, we now knew how to get the bus and had a better understanding of how to get around by foot, too. So, as per usual, we went for a wander. We walked the streets of Copenhagen for a few hours, looking at the shops, the many, narrow off-streets, and all of the bicycles. The day was also very sunny, so the coloured buildings were vivid and bright, which made it even more appealing.

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There were more bikes than I had ever seen. And even multi-storey bike racks. Apparently there are 3 times more bikes in Denmark than there are people.

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We soon found a tall observatory tower which was only 25 DK to climb, so since it was such a nice day we decided it would be well worth it. And it was.

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After another wander, we soon found the canal harbour, the part of Copenhagen I wanted to see most.

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It was so beautiful, so we decided to go on a canal tour, which was 75 DK.

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It was so cold by the end that we had to go for a coffee and a Danish pastry.

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By the time it got dark we planned to meet one of Amy’s friends who had moved to Denmark 4 years ago. He took us to a proper Danish bar, that was full of graffiti, where you were allowed to smoke inside, and the drinks were proper cheap.

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Later, when his girlfriend arrived, we were taken to a more classy bar for another drink, and they taught us a lot about Denmark in general. We discussed the language barriers, which many people living in Denmark even struggle with, as the locals aren’t used to foreign people trying to speak their language with their difficult pronunciations because Danish is such an uncommon language for others to learn. They also told us that the Danish phrase for “What are you saying?” is one of the most used phrases as Danish people can’t even understand each other most of the time. So that was encouraging. We also spoke about how much Danish people recycle, how they don’t go into full-time careers until their late 20s, and how their lives seem much better off in general. It was a great conversation and we all learnt a lot.

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